Vacuole

Vallecular Canal

                    DIAGRAM:  Equisetum Stem

                          PHOTO:  Equisetum Stem Cross Section
                                           Equisetum Stem Cross Section

                                           Equisetum Rhizome Cross Section
                                           Equisetum Rhizome Cross Section
                                           Equisetum Rhizome Cross Section

Valves

Vapor

Variety

Vascular Bundles

Vascular bundles are clusters of xylem and phloem conducting elements that conduct food, water, and minerals throughtout the plant.  Plants are able to live on land because they have the vascular tissue for the nourishment of the cells as does the vascular tissue of animal cells.

                    DIAGRAM:  

                          PHOTO:  Monocot Stem Cross Section / Monocot Stem Cross Section

Vascular Cambium

This is a layer of cells that is about two to four cells thick and exists between the xylem and phloem.  It only occurs in stems where there is secondary growth.  It is all meristem tissue that is rapidly dividing, producing ray initials and fusiform initials.

                    DIAGRAM:  Growth of Woody Stems
                                           Stem Sections

                          PHOTO:  Pinus Stem Cross Section
                                           3-year Tilia Stem Cross Section
                                           6-year Tilia Stem Cross Section

Vascular Connection

Vascular Cylinder

                    DIAGRAM:  Vascular Cylinder / Vascular Cylinder

                          PHOTO:  Root Cross Section / Root Cross Section

Vascular Tissues

The vascular tissues are the xylem and phloem tissues that carry food, water and minerals through the plant for the nourishment of the cells.

                    DIAGRAM:  

                          PHOTO:  Puccinia

Vegetation

Vegetative

                    DIAGRAM:  

                          PHOTO:  Nostoc Vegetative Cells
                                           Nostoc Vegetative Cells
                                           Nostoc Vegetative Cells

                                           Oscillatoria Vegetative Cells
                                           Oscillatoria Vegetative Cells

                                           Saprolegnia Vegetative Hyphae
                                           Saprolegnia Vegetative Hyphae

Veinlets

The very small veins out in the mesophyll of the leaf that may comsist of only one xylem or phloem element.

Veins

Veins are the vascular bundles in the leaves.  In the petiole and the midvein of the leaf the veins are very large.  The farther out into the mesophyll the veins go the smaller they get.  Out there, they may consist of only one xylem or phloem element.  In these regions, these very small veins are called veinlets.

Veld

Venter

                  DIAGRAM:

                          PHOTO:   Marchantia / Marchantia / Marchantia / Marchantia

Ventral Canal Cell

                    DIAGRAM:  

                          PHOTO:  Marchantia

Ventral Suture

Vernalization

Vertical

Vessels

Vessels are vessel elements hooked together end to end in the plant stem, root, and leaf.  Sometimes, vessels can be several feet to yards long.

                    DIAGRAM:  Stem Sections
                                           Monocot Vascular Bundle
                                           Sclerenchyma

                          PHOTO:  6-year Tilia Stem Cross Section
                                           Monocot Vascular Bundle Cross Section

Vessel Elements

Vessel elements are the individual cells that make up the vessel.  Vessel elements are in the xylem and are dead when functioning.  They function to carry water and minerals upward in the stem and root.  Morphologically, they are short and sort of fat cells with slightly oblique cross walls that are nearly non-existant in the mature cells.  Many times there will only be some bars of secondary tissue there to hold the end of the vessel element open so it won't colapse.  The cell walls contain lignin and are pitted.  Vessels have unique secondary wall thickening that distinguish them from all other cells.  The wall thickenings may be spiral, annular, reticulate, pitted etc.

                    DIAGRAM:  Stem Sections
                                           Monocot Vascular Bundle
                                           Sclerenchyma

                          PHOTO:  6-year Tilia Stem Cross Section
                                           Monocot Vascular Bundle Cross Section

Viable

Vulnerable